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I was given the assignment to somehow creatively use the story of Job and Waiting for Godot together. I decided I would try to write an alternate Act II for the play and infuse Job into the story and imagine how it might have gone differently under those circumstances. My brief Act II is obviously a Christian interpretation of the story of Waiting for Godot and what Vladimir and Estragon are really waiting for. This is my first attempt ever at writing anything like this and I have no self delusion that it's all that good but I thought I'd share my attempt at creativity with you anyway. Obviously if you know the play Waiting for Godot you will probably find this more meaningful and will be a better judge of what I've tried to do here. But hopefully it will be enjoyable all the same to those who have not yet read the story. You can get the book here.



An alternate Act II for Waiting for Godot.

Next day. Same time. Same place. Someone unexpected.

Vladimir and Estragon enter stage left, already busy in discussion, ignorant of their surroundings at present. A man sits by the tree and is admiring Estragon’s boots.


Estragon: What are we doing today?

Vladimir: Nothing, I expect.

Estragon: Seems like we had a reason for coming back here though, doesn’t it?

Vladimir: Things aren’t always what they seem though are they?

Estragon: Quite right. Quite right. But still I can’t help the feeling we were supposed to meet someone here.

Vladimir: Godot!

Estragon: God bless you!

Vladimir: What? No! Mr. Godot! That is who we are supposed to meet here.

Estragon: Ah! Quite right. Quite right. Oh, perhaps that’s him there.

Vladimir: Him where?

Estragon: Him there...trying on my boots he is. Sitting in my spot no less!

Vladimir: Surely not. (Turns around to face the stranger) Surely so! But surely that humble stranger cannot be Mr. Godot.

Estragon: Why? What does Mr. Godot look like?

Vladimir: I haven’t an idea.

Estragon: Perhaps he looks like that!

(Vladimir and Estragon stare each other in the eye for a minute and then simultaneously turn and stare at the stranger for minute then simultaneously look at each other again.)

Vladimir & Estragon: (In unison) Godot?

Vladimir: (Turning toward the stranger once again) You there sir! What is your name?

Job: Oh hello, I’ve been waiting for you.

Estragon: You say you’ve been waiting for us? How long?

Job: Oh just a short while now really.

Estragon: How do you like those boots?

Job: Not sure what it is but there is something not quite comfortable about them. They feel too tight and too loose all at once.

Estragon: (Hold his head in his hands and weeps) Finally someone who understands.

Vladimir: (To Estragon) Understands? Nevermind that. (To Job) What was your name then? And why should you be waiting for us?

Job: Oh, I’m sorry. How rude of me not to answer your original question.

Estragon: (To Vladimir in a whisper) What did we ask him again?

Job: My name is Job.

Vladimir: I see. I see. Like the biblical character?

Job: Oh yes. Very much like him. Identical to him actually.

Estragon: That’s who your parents named you after?

Job: No. That’s who I am.

Vladimir: You mean to say you are the very same man?

Job: The very one!

Vladimir: (Turns to Estragon) He’s mad.

Estragon: (Turns to Vladimir) Crazier than a sack of cats?

Vladimir: Delusional as the day is long.

Estragon: Perhaps... but he understands.

Vladimir: Understands? Understands what?

Estragon: The boots.

Vladimir: What?

Job: Gentlemen, gentlemen. I have been sent here to meet you.

Vladimir: Sent by who?

Estragon: What he said (gesturing at Vladimir).

Job: You must know!

Vladimir & Estragon: (In unison) Godot?

Job: He’s been called that before.

Vladimir: You mean to say he is called other things than Godot?

Job: Oh yes, he has gone by a great many names. Tell me, gentlemen, do you even know who you are waiting for?

Estragon: (Whispers to Vladimir) I thought we were waiting for Godot?

Job: Yes but do you know Mr. Godot? Do you really know who he is?

Estragon: (Bursts out laughing) My he has good hearing!

Vladimir: Doesn’t he?

Estragon: He does.

Vladimir: Doesn’t he!

Job: Well? Do you know him?

Vladimir: What difference does knowing him make?

Job: It makes all the difference I tell you. Why do you come here, this place, day after day?

Vladimir & Estragon: (In unison) We are waiting for Mr. Godot!

Vladimir: A slow one!

Estragon: Hard of hearing.

Vladimir: Short in memory!

Estragon: But still…

Vladimir: Still what?

Estragon: He understands.

Vladimir: Oh bother. Not this again!

Job: (interrupting their exchange) Gentlemen please! Why are you waiting for whom you do not know?

Estragon: If we were not waiting for him what would we be doing otherwise?

Job: Knowing him.

Vladimir: Knowing him?

Estragon: Knowing Him!

Job: I was like you both once. I waited too. The difference between you and me is   that he showed up. When he did...well...it changed everything.

Estragon: (Whispers to Vladimir) Who do you think showed up?

Job: Mr. Godot of course!

Estragon: (Falls to the ground laughing uncontrollably) Ears like a bat that one!

Vladimir: No, no, no. I’ve read your story.

Job: Good!

Vladimir: No, no, no. Mr. Godot does not show up in your story!

Estragon: (Stops laughing and sits up on the ground leaning on his arms) Who does then?

Vladimir: God!

Estragon: You know this is a biblical man, you might watch your language sir!

Vladimir: No, no, no! It is God who shows up.

Job: Exactly so.

Vladimir: But you said Mr. Godot showed up!

Job: So I did.

Vladimir: You make no sense.

Job: Do you know who you are waiting for?

(Estragon stands up and places his right hand on Vladimir’s left shoulder)

Estragon: Do you think…

Vladimir: Could it be?

Job: Why do you wait for Mr. Godot?

Vladimir: (Long pause) Purpose. It gives us some sort of purpose.

Estragon: (To Job) Not nearly enough. (To Vladimir) Did you bring any rope today?

Job: Do you know why you’ll never meet Mr. Godot here?

Estragon: Do tell!

Job: Because he already came. And as long as all you do is wait, you’ll never find him. (Pauses momentarily) You can know him though. You can meet him.

Vladimir: (Desperately and in tears) Where!? Where do we go? What must we do to find him!?

Estragon: Yes. Please tell us. We are so tired of waiting.

Job: Matthew 11:25-30

(Job hands them a New Testament and vanishes before their eyes)


 
 
 
 
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Today the ISWA is celebrating their 5th anniversary as a ministry of bringing together women who are professional apologists for the purpose of equipping the church with a reasoned defense of the faith. The ISWA's stated mission is as follows:

  • To encourage women to enter the field of Apologetics and related disciplines
  • To encourage and train women to be lay-defenders of the faith and to equip their children
  • To fill a void in current Women’s ministry
  • To connect women currently in the field of Apologetics and related disciplines



We need more people in the church, both men and women, to enter into the field of apologetics and to train others to think critically about issues facing the church today from a solidly biblical worldview. Too many believers are content with ankle deep "Bible studies" that are really more about themselves than the Bible and we must get people to think deeply about the Christian worldview and how we can know it is true and what that means for us and the world. To see this happen, however, it means some people have to stand up in their local churches and say "I want to go deeper!"

I appreciate Sarah Ankenman, president of the ISWA, and the many other lady apologists that are connected with this ministry for challenging women in the church to go deeper, think harder and engage the world for Christ. One of the most important places for apologetics to happen is in the home as we raise our children and one of the most influential people in the home is the one we call "Mom." So whether you as a woman have an ambition to start your own apologetics ministry and want to write and speak to other women about engaging the world with a rational defense of the faith, or whether you want to lead an apologetics small group study in your church or if you want to simply make sure your kids are given the foundation they need to have an intellectually satisfied faith that will stand the test of  time (and the pressure of their friends and future professors) then you need to get connected with the International Society of Women in Apologetics.

You can follow the ISWA on Twitter: @ladyapologists and visit their webstite: www.womeninapologetics.com



 
 
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There once was a young man who was a spiritual seeker who longed to know the truth about God and salvation. He listened to many of the religious teachers of his day but often felt put off by what they were saying. One day an angel appeared to this young man and revealed to him that the Christians of his day were all wrong and none of them held the truth. The angel told the young man that God would use him to restore the truth about who God really is and how salvation might be attained. This young man would go on to reveal the sacred Scriptures of his religion and win many people to the faith that he now proclaimed.

Who is this man that I am referring to? If you said "Joseph Smith" then you are correct. However, if you said "Muhammad the prophet of Islam" then you are also correct! In fact if you compare the start up stories of both the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) and also Islam you will find that there are some striking similarities in how they began. To be sure there are differences in detail such as Muhammad says it was the angel Gabriel who appeared to him where as Joseph Smith called the angel that appeared to him Moroni. Certainly the kind of religious practices that came from these two religions also varies widely, and they had their beginning centuries apart. Even so, the origin stories of both are eerily similar. 

One of the most interesting things about both of these stories is that the Bible addresses the exact issue of what a person ought to do should an angel appear and present a different gospel than the one the apostles of Christ handed down to us. In Galatians 1:6-9 the apostle Paul writes:

6 I am astonished that you are so quickly deserting him who called you in the grace of Christ and are turning to a different gospel-- 7 not that there is another one, but there are some who trouble you and want to distort the gospel of Christ. 8 But even if we or an angel from heaven should preach to you a gospel contrary to the one we preached to you, let him be accursed. 9 As we have said before, so now I say again: If anyone is preaching to you a gospel contrary to the one you received, let him be accursed.

Had either Joseph Smith or Muhammad known and/or headed the word of God then neither religion would have started. It's uncertain what actually occurred at the beginning of these two religions, did they actually see what they believed to be an angel of God or did they just make the whole thing up? Regardless, both religions are a product of rejecting the warning of Galatians 1.


In my conversations with LDS Church members I often bring up both Galatians 1 and the similarities between their faith's origin story and that of Islam's story. Given that both Muslims and Mormons are equally sincere about their beliefs and given that they both make the same truth claims about having restored the truth through their prophet, and given that their teachings are contradict their own, whom should we believe? It would seem that claims of sincerity in experience are not enough. Just as the Mormon has felt a burning in his bosom that God has shown him the Book of Mormon is true, so also a Muslim might attest to a similar experience where Allah has confirmed the truth of Islam to him (and for that matter a Buddhist might claim some form of enlightenment that came to him and a the traditional Christian would probably attest to assurance from the Holy Spirit that they have believed the truth).

So how then should we adjudicate between claims of religious experience? The answer is that we must do so by investigating the truth claims made by a particular religion. We have to ask our Mormon and Muslim friends "Given the similarities in story between these two faiths and that they have similar religious testimony, why should I believe you and not them?" Also, "Can people ever have a false religious experience?" Finally, "How do you know you haven't had a false religious experience?"

The only way to adjudicate between religious claims is through the evidence. Traditional (historic) Christianity is well attested on many different fronts that both LDS and Islamic faiths fail on. I don't want to downplay the importance of religious experience because there is validity to it, but our religious experience must be in sync with reality also. I believe I have experienced the power of the Holy Spirit in my life, but I can also rationally demonstrate that Christianity is true. If you can't do that with what you believe then how can you really know you're on the right side of religious experience?

 
 
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There are some incredible apologetics arguments out there. I mean, truly, there are some mind-blowingly powerful arguments in defense of the faith. Arguments for God’s existence such as The Cosmological Argument (Kalam or otherwise), The Teleological Argument, The Ontological Argument, The Moral Argument and more. For the resurrection we have the Minimal Facts Argument which is, I think, the most persuasive case for the resurrection out there. For the reliability of the Bible we have an embarrassment of riches when it comes to the amount of extant manuscripts that show how the Bible has been preserved over the centuries, and we have incredible secondary sources from early church fathers to early enemy testimony that corroborates information in the Bible, and we have archaeological evidence that strongly supports many facts spoken of in the Bible about people, places and things. Truly the cumulative case for Christianity is impressive and, in my opinion, extremely cogent.

Not only do we have well formed arguments that have been tried, tested and found strong over the centuries which have been refined by fire to be even stronger today, but we also have some pretty incredible people who have utilized these arguments. Christianity has arguably produced some of the finest minds the world has ever known. Augustine, Aquinas, Pascal, Calvin, to name a few famous ones in the history of the church and, in more contemporary times, we have (or had) people like C. S. Lewis, Francis Schaeffer, Alvin Plantinga, William Lane Craig, Ravi Zacharias, J. P. Moreland, and more. All of whom no one in their right mind would call dimwitted or uneducated. And all of these men throughout the history of the church up to our present day have created, developed, perfected and/or delivered incredibly persuasive arguments in favor of Christianity.

The fact is, we have the goods. We have the real ability to compete in the marketplace of ideas and win. With some of the best arguments and minds on our side we can get fair minded people to accept core truths of Christianity such as God exists, truth exists, objective moral values exist, the Bible is a reliable witness to historical events, Jesus was a real person who lived, died and rose bodily from the dead, that Jesus is God, etc., etc. And all of these are incredibly important and impressively defensible. But all of this, all of our apologetics effort, is worthless if…

If we fail to defend the gospel itself.

It’s unfortunate that we can perhaps win people to propositional truth but fail to reach them with the gospel. The fact is a person can both believe all of those facts above and can even want to be a Christian but still have a wrong view of the gospel and be lost. If a person believes that God exists, truth exists, objective moral values exist, Jesus really lived, died and rose again bodily they can still be lost. They could still believe, like the Circumcision Party (Judaizers) in Galatians 1, that they have to have faith in Jesus but that they also have to work for their salvation and in the end be damned. Let’s face it, the people Paul was addressing weren’t denying you had to believe in Jesus, but they were adding to the gospel and the apostle Paul was rightfully concerned about this leading people to Hell.

Such being the case one of our greatest apologetic tasks is to articulate and defend the biblical gospel itself. Many apologists have taken on an overly ecumenical approach to apologetics and have affirmed a kind of “Mere Christianity” that is, I think, less than Christian. Not to knock on biblical ecuminicism, for their are many things that do not separate people from the body of Christ that we may disagree about. Whether you are a pre, mid or post tribulation rapture believer, or a Historic Premillennialist, Dispensationalist, Amillennialist, etc., you can be a Christian. Whether you believe in credo or paedo baptism, you can be a Christian. Whether you believe election is individual or corporate, you can be a Christian. But if you have the gospel wrong, if you think you have something to do with saving yourself with the help of Jesus, you don’t get the gospel and you can’t be a Christian.

We need to be very careful that in the midst of all our defending of propositions about Christianity that we don’t fail to defend the gospel itself. We need to not be so quick to look at all the the things we affirm together and say “I’m okay, you’re okay” if we have forgotten to check the most important of all issues which we need to be together on. Aspirin and Arsenic may look very similar, but in the end it is their contents that make the difference. So, are you defending the gospel itself in your apologetics?

“For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast.” - Ephesians 2:8-9

 
 
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I’m a humanities student and my family has chosen to home school our kids in the classical method. As such one of the things that gets emphasized often is seeking “the true, the good and the beautiful” and this is something which, by the way, I am all for. Our society has become hopelessly shallow. People are easily entertained by worthless things just to turn around and be bored by something that has value. Truth is often relativized and the notion of any kind of absolute is offensive to the mind of many. Likewise our moral compass has come unhinged and is drifting further and further away as society distances themselves from a moral law giver (i.e. God). And rather than seeking beauty our society destroys it wherever it can, turning it into smut. Rather than producing fine art they produce obscene and meaningless images.

We desperately need a new generation that is disgusted by the relativistic, atheistic and perverse nature of this age. We must encourage people to seek after that which is true, not just for you or just for me, but inherently, objectively, absolutely true. We must push people to recognize good for good and evil for evil to be able to distinguish between the two. We must implore people to see what real beauty is, that an objective standard of beauty does actually exist and that perversions of that beauty are a crime unto themselves and not something to be cherished in the heart of mankind.

Yes, we need to pursue the true, the good and the beautiful. Even so, I see a trend that I also find disturbing that I wish to address, namely, that in pursuit of these things some have pursued them out of order and have fallen into grave error by so doing. There is good reason that truth, goodness and beauty are the appropriate order of things much like there is reason for the order of “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” That is to say the first in each list has primacy (i.e. is most important and comes before the others necessarily).

By way of example let’s consider the line mentioned above from The Declaration of Independence which more fully states “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” Why is it that “life” necessarily take precedence over “liberty” and “the pursuit of happiness”? It’s simple when you think about it. If a person is deprived of life then they are necessarily deprived of liberty (freedom) and also pursuit of happiness. If you read these backwards into one another and ask questions like “what are the limitations of my pursuit of happiness?” the answer is that my pursuit of happiness is limited when it encroaches on someone else’s liberty or life. If it makes me happy to have lots of land, and so I take possession of as much as I can then that’s fine. But if my method of doing so is to take away from my neighbor what rightfully is his then I should be stopped. Or if I seek to kill people to take their land then I should be stopped. My pursuit of my own happiness is cut short when I infringe on other people’s pursuit of happiness, or their liberty or their life. So also my liberty is limited by the right that other people have to liberty and life. Life is primary because the other two depend on it, liberty is secondary because pursuit of happiness depends on it and the pursuit of happiness is third because although important it is only permissible insofar as it doesn’t violate the other two rights of the people.

I believe that this is essentially the same when it comes to the true, the good and the beautiful. Truth is first rank in importance and, indeed, it limits what is good and what is beautiful. If something is not true, it is neither good nor beautiful; rather it is evil and a perversion of true beauty. Some of the things that we may think are good or that are beautiful according to our own subjective standard, if held to the light of truth, will turn out not to be so after all. If you stop and think for a moment you can probably think of something that many may consider good or beautiful that are not true. If you stop and think harder and more honestly you may uncover something that you have thought to be good or beautiful that is in reality a lie and therefore evil and perverse.

I’ll never forget the first time I walked into a certain church and it was “beautiful.” The architecture of the building, the stained glass, the way the service was performed with various lights, sounds and even smells that highlighted different aspects of the service. I was moved by the “beauty” of it all. It was not hard to see what would attract people to this other-worldly experience that seemed so unique and different from our daily experiences. But at the end of the day this church still taught a false gospel. The fact that the gospel was perverted into something it should not be in turn voids out what otherwise might be good or beautiful about it.

It’s so crucial that truth be preeminent because if it is not you may follow a man-centered “good and beautiful” all the way to hell. 


 
 
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It’s obvious that our culture is enamored with zombies, vampires and everything otherwise known as “undead.” One of the most popular television shows currently is a series called The Walking Dead in which you follow the lives of survivors of the zombie apocalypse as they try to stay alive. Whether it is movies, television shows, or video games there are zombies everywhere!

I think some people are pretty well convinced that the zombie apocalypse is inevitable and, although I don’t buy that for a minute, it’s hard not to give some thought to how well you’d fare if indeed it did occur. How many of us haven’t watched a movie or television show and imagined ourselves in the place of the main character and asked “what would I do if I found myself in his/her shoes?” When it comes to zombies, who is the most likely to survive?

Invariably it is those who have the most common sense and the most ammo that have the best chance to make it through to the end. Those who, for all their paranoia, had already stockpiled food and weapons and those who have enough sense not to walk down into dark cellars and alley ways, or not to go into an indefensible position nor take on a superior force without the means to overcome. It is these who are the ones who just might make it. Let’s face it, if the zombie apocalypse takes you off guard and you have to go looking for food, shelter and ammunition after the zombies are already on top of you, well….it was nice knowing you.

Okay, so why am I talking about this? “Has Jacob decided to just blog whatever is on his mind this morning?” Well, yes I have. But the good news is that the zombie apocalypse got me thinking about apologetics. In fact I got to thinking about the similarities between trying to survive the zombies and trying to survive apologetic or evangelistic encounters. In reality it is the same kind of person (sort of) who will do well in both situations.

Now I am not saying that the guy who has lots of loaded weapons, a stockpile of canned goods and a bunker is the ideal apologist. What I am saying is it is he (or she) who prepares ahead of time for the inevitable event whom will most likely survive it. Whereas the successful zombie apocalypse survivor stockpiles weapons and bullets, the successful Christian apologist stockpiles arguments. Whereas the successful zombie apocalypse survivor thinks about what the most defensible and fortified position is physically, so the successful apologist thinks about what is the most defensible and fortified position theologically and philosophically. Whereas the successful zombie apocalypse survivor knows whether he ought to attack or retreat depending on whether he has enough ammo so should the successful apologist know when to engage and when hold back based upon their own ability to address a situation.

One of the most poignant similarities between the successful survivor of the zombie apocalypse and the successful apologist is that they are ready for the incident before it occurs. They have been planning what they would do just in case it happens. Some people might think they are a bit odd being so preoccupied with what might occur, but when it does occur who is ready for it?

As Christians we would benefit from some forethought about scenarios that may occur in the future. If an atheist says “A” I would respond with “B.” If a Mormon missionary comes to my door, I will be prepared to answer them in this way. If someone says “The Bible is full of errors and contradictions” how should I respond to that? You can think of thousands of scenarios where your faith may come under attack and it may be tempting to say about any one of those possibilities “Yeah, but that’s unlikely to happen.” But boy if it does wouldn’t you fare much better if you were prepared?

Your Christian faith will be attacked and probably has been already at some point in the past. Think of a time where someone has said something that you wish you could have responded to but didn’t know how. Why not intentionally prepare for such engagements before they occur? Why not be ready for when the “zombies” start scratching at your door? I think you’ll be glad you had the foresight to prepare for the inevitable once it is upon you.

A Place to Start:

I Don’t Have Enough Faith to be an Atheist by Norman Geisler and Frank Turek

Cold Case Christianity by J. Warner Wallace

Tactics by Greg Koukl



By the way, the Bible tells us that apart from Christ we are all zombies, having the appearance of life but truly being dead even though we are walking around...


"And you were dead in the trespasses and sins 2 in which you once walked, following the course of this world, following the prince of the power of the air, the spirit that is now at work in the sons of disobedience— 3 among whom we all once lived in the passions of our flesh, carrying out the desires of the body and the mind, and were by nature children of wrath, like the rest of mankind. 4 But God, being rich in mercy, because of the great love with which he loved us, 5 even when we were dead in our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ—by grace you have been saved— 6 and raised us up with him and seated us with him in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus, 7 so that in the coming ages he might show the immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus. 8 For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, 9 not a result of works, so that no one may boast. 10 For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them." (Ephesians 2:1-10)


 
 
I often get questions from people who wish to know about which institutions have programs in Christian Apologetics, which ones are the best, what are the costs, who has the best accreditation, etc. In an attempt to answer these questions as best I can, and as easily as possible, I have created this master list. To the best of my knowledge this list is current and I will try to maintain it as best as I can. Some programs in philosophy and Ethics are listed as well from institutions that are apologetics minded or that can be tailored towards apologetics.

Schools are listed according to current accreditation status, residency or distance options. I will comment on some schools/programs as to their reputation and quality as well. This is, of course, subject to my own perspective and knowledge of the particular school or program so you just have to take it as such. As far as tuition, that is constantly changing so you need to contact the schools or look it up on the website yourself. Keep in mind that some schools accept federal student loans whereas others insist on the student paying as they go to avoid debt, you will have to ask the financial aid office of each school you are interested in.

My hope is that you will find this list to be very helpful while researching various programs and that you will be able to share it with others who are interested in working in the field of Christian apologetics. If you have any additional information that you would like to suggest be added to the list (or if you spot an error or something that needs updated) then please let me know so that I make the appropriate changes. I appreciate your help in keeping this list as up to date as possible.


Certificate Programs:

Biola University: Certificate in Christian Apologetics

Reputation: Very well respected, leading school for apologetics training, non-denominational Evangelical. (Evidential Apologetics)

Accreditation:  Biola University holds institutional accreditation by the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. (The certificate program can be rolled into a few hours of credit towards Biola's M.A. in Apologetics.)

Distance/Residence: Completely Distance

Birmingham Theological Seminary: Certificate in Apologetics

Reputation: Theologically Reformed and Presbyterian. (Presuppositional Apologetics)

Accreditation:  BTS is a member of theAssociation of Reformed Theological Seminaries (ARTS). ARTS has not yet obtained recognition from the U.S. Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). 

Distance/Residence: Contact School

Christian Apologetics & Research Ministry: Apologetics SchoolCritical Thinking School

Reputation: CARM is well known and has some excellent resources. If you're looking to get your feet wet in Apologetics this is an excellent place to start.

Accreditation: N/A

Distance/Residence: Completely distance.

Columbia Evangelical Seminary: Certificate in Apologetics

Reputation: Very good reputation as a school who is committed to training Christian leaders and ministers with high academic standards and a unique approach to education via academic mentorship. This is the only non-accredited school that I know personally that I feel I can recommend.

Accreditation: N/A

Distance/Residence: Completely Distance

Ligonier Ministries: Certificate in Apologetics

Reputation: Founded by R.C. Sproul Ligonier is a well respected ministry which is theologically Reformed. (Classical Apologetics)

Accreditation: Contact School

Distance/Residence: Completely Distance

Southern Evangelical Seminary: Certificate in Islamic Studies; Certificate in Scientific Apologetics

Reputation: Considered to be among the top schools for Christian Apologetics training, non-denominational and Evangelical. (Evidential Apologetics).

Accreditation:   TRACS (www.TRACS.org) is one of only two national accrediting organizations that are recognized by CHEA (www.CHEA.org) and the USDE (www.ED.gov) and in addition hold full membership with INQAAHE (www.INQAAHE.org). 

Distance/Residence: Completely Distance

Undergraduate Programs:

Boyce College: B.A. Christian Worldview & Apologetics

Reputation: Boyce is the undergraduate school of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and is very well respected. Theologically Reformed.

Accreditation:  Accredited by Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACS) and the Association of Theological Schools (ATS).

Distance/Residence: On-Campus

Columbia Evangelical Seminary: Th.A.; Th.B. & B.C.S. in Apologetics or Philosophy

Reputation: Very good reputation as a school who is committed to training Christian leaders and ministers with high academic standards and a unique approach to education via academic mentorship. This is the only non-accredited school that I know personally that I feel I can recommend.

Accreditation: N/A

Distance/Residence: Completely Distance 

Luther Rice University: B.A. Religion & Christian Worldview

Reputation: Luther Rice University has a great reputation of high academic quality and are pioneers in fully accredited distance education, they are a rising school in apologetics training.

Accreditation:  TRACS (www.TRACS.org) is one of only two national accrediting organizations that are recognized by CHEA (www.CHEA.org) and the USDE (www.ED.gov) and in addition hold full membership with INQAAHE (www.INQAAHE.org).  Word has it that LRU is pursuing Regional accreditation as well.

Distance/Residence: Offered both completely online and on campus.

Graduate Programs:

Baptist Bible Seminary: M.A. Biblical Apologetics

Reputation: The school is well respected and has good accreditation but my own experience in the program says it's not as strong as some of the other apologetics programs on this list.

Accreditation: BBS is accredited by by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and the Association for Biblical Higher Education.

Distance/Residance: This program can be complete online with no on-campus components required.

Biola University: M.A. Christian ApologeticsM.A. Science & Religion

Reputation: Very well respected, leading school for apologetics training, non-denominational Evangelical. (Evidential Apologetics)

Accreditation:  Biola University holds institutional accreditation by the Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. 

Distance/Residence: This program is offered both on campus in the evenings or as a modular program with work done at home on-line with two trips to campus during the summer for two week intensives.

Birmingham Theological Seminary: M.A. Apologetics

Reputation: Theologically Reformed and Presbyterian. (Presuppositional Apologetics)

Accreditation:  BTS is a member of theAssociation of Reformed Theological Seminaries (ARTS). ARTS has not yet obtained recognition from the U.S. Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). 

Distance/Residence: Contact School 

Columbia Evangelical Seminary: M.C.S.; M.Rel.; M. Apol.; M.C.Phil.; M.T.S.; M.Div.; Th.M. Apologetics of Philosophy

Reputation: Very good reputation as a school who is committed to training Christian leaders and ministers with high academic standards and a unique approach to education via academic mentorship. 
This is the only non-accredited school that I know personally that I feel I can recommend.

Accreditation: N/A

Distance/Residence: Completely Distance  

Denver Seminary: M.A. Apologetics & Ethics

Reputation: Highly respected school with well known apologist Dr. Douglas Groothuis leading the program. 

Accreditation: Association of Theological Schools (ATS) and North Central Association of Colleges and Schools .

Distance/Residence: On Campus only

Faith Evangelical Seminary: M.A.T.S. Apologetics

Reputation: Formerly a Lutheran school but now non-denominational and evangelical.

Accreditation:  TRACS (www.TRACS.org) is one of only two national accrediting organizations that are recognized by CHEA (www.CHEA.org) and the USDE (www.ED.gov) and in addition hold full membership with INQAAHE (www.INQAAHE.org).   

Distance/Residence: Both on campus and distance options are available.

Houston Baptist University: M.A. ApologeticsM.A. Philosophy

Reputation: HBU has acquired an impressive faculty in a very short amount of time making them a serious competitor with Biola University for the top apologetics program in the country. I personally feel the push the boundaries of ecumenicism further than they ought, but you will without a doubt learn from top apologetics minds and practioners at HBU.

Accreditation:  Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS).

Distance/Residence: On campus only

Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary: M.A. Philosophical Studies 

Reputation: Long standing as a strongly evangelical school Liberty is well respected.

Accreditation: Regionally accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS-COC) to award degrees at associate, baccalaureate, master’s, education specialist and doctoral levels. 

Distance/Residence: This program is on campus only.

Luther Rice University: M.A. Apologetics


Reputation: Luther Rice University has a great reputation of high academic quality and are pioneers in fully accredited distance education, they are a rising school in apologetics training. With some recent changes to the M.A. in Apologetics program and with Dr. Scott Henderson and Dr. David Leonard on faculty this program is worth your attention.

Accreditation:  TRACS (www.TRACS.org) is one of only two national accrediting organizations that are recognized by CHEA (www.CHEA.org) and the USDE (www.ED.gov) and in addition hold full membership with INQAAHE (www.INQAAHE.org).  Word has it that LRU is pursuing Regional accreditation as well.

Distance/Residence: Offered both completely online and on campus. 



Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary: M.A. Biblical Archaeology 

Reputation: One of the Southern Baptist Conventions main 6 seminaries MBTS is a solid school.


Accreditation: Midwestern maintains professional and academic accreditation with two accrediting associations: The Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada and The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (HLC). Associate membership with ATS began in December 1961. Full membership and accreditation were received in 1964. 


Distance/Residence: This program is residence only.

New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary: M.Div. Apologetics

Reputation: One of the big 6 Southern Baptist seminaries NOBTS is well known and respected.

Accreditation: New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate, baccalaureate, masters, and doctorate degrees. Accredited by the Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada.

Distance/Residence: On campus (some classes may be taken online)

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary: M.Div. Worldview & Apologetics

Reputation: The flagship seminary of the Southern Baptist Convention, SBTS is theologically Reformed and Baptist and is well respected as a school with world renowned faculty.

Accreditation:   Accredited by Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACS) and the Association of Theological Schools (ATS).


Distance/Residence: On Campus (some classes available online)

Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary: M.A. Ethics, Theology & Culture; M.A. Philosophy of ReligionM.Div. Christian EthicsM.Div. Christian Apologetics 

Reputation: Another of the big 6 SBC seminaries SEBTS is also very well established and respected.

Accreditation:  Accredited by Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACS) and the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). 

Distance/Residence: On campus (some classes available online)

Southern Evangelical Seminary: M.A. Apologetics; M.A. Philosophy; M.Div. Apologetics 

Reputation: Considered one of the leading schools in apologetics training SES is a very well respected shool that is non-denominational and solidly Evangelical.

Accreditation:  TRACS (www.TRACS.org) is one of only two national accrediting organizations that are recognized by CHEA (www.CHEA.org) and the USDE (www.ED.gov) and in addition hold full membership with INQAAHE (www.INQAAHE.org).  

Distance/Residence: Both on campus and distance options available.

Trinity International University: M.A. Bioethics

Reputation: A top notch school that is well established and respected. If you are interested in pro-life apologetics then this program should have your attention.

Accreditation: Accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

Distance/Residence: Modular program, online with intensives on campus.

Trinity Evangelical Divinity School: M.A. Philosophy of Religion

Reputation: Well respected as one of the top Evangelical schools for theological training.

Accreditation:  Accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. 

Distance/Residence: On campus

Veritas Evangelical Seminary: Master of Christian Apologetics

Reputation: A relatively new school with New School but with a well respected faculty, Evangelical and non-denominational.

Accreditation: A member of the Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools (TRACS). 

Distance/Residence: Both distance and on campus options.

Doctoral Programs:

Columbia Evangelical Seminary: D.C.S.; D.Min.; D.Rel.; D.T.S.; D.C. Phil.; Th.D. Apologetics or Philosophy

Reputation: Very good reputation as a school who is committed to training Christian leaders and ministers with high academic standards and a unique approach to education via academic mentorship. 
This is the only non-accredited school that I know personally that I feel I can recommend.

Accreditation: N/A

Distance/Residence: Completely Distance  

Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary: Ph.D. Theology & Apologetics

Reputation: Long standing as a strongly evangelical school, Liberty is well respected.

Accreditation: Regionally accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS-COC) to award degrees at associate, baccalaureate, master’s, education specialist and doctoral levels. 

Distance/Residence: This program is modular with online and intensive on campus components.

Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary: Ph.D. Philosophy of Religion; Ethics

Reputation: Another of the big 6 SBC seminaries SEBTS is also very well established and respected.

Accreditation:  Accredited by Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACS) and the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). 

Distance/Residence: On campus 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary: Ph.D. Christian Ethics; Ph.D. Apologetics & Worldview; Ph.D. Christian Philosophy; Ph.D. Applied Apologetics; Ph.D. Christianity & the Arts

Reputation: The flagship seminary of the Southern Baptist Convention, SBTS is theologically Reformed and Baptist and is well respected as a school with world renowned faculty.

Accreditation:   Accredited by Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACS) and the Association of Theological Schools (ATS).

Distance/Residence: Modular format requiring online courses and on campus intensives.

Southern Evangelical Seminary: D.Min Apologetics; Ph.D. Philosophy of Religion

Reputation: Considered one of the leading schools in apologetics training SES is a very well respected shool that is non-denominational and solidly Evangelical. 

Accreditation:  TRACS (www.TRACS.org) is one of only two national accrediting organizations that are recognized by CHEA (www.CHEA.org) and the USDE (www.ED.gov) and in addition hold full membership with INQAAHE (www.INQAAHE.org).  

Distance/Residence: Ph.D. is on campus only, D.Min. is modular with online courses and on campus intensives.


 
 
 

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